travel

How to visit Paris on a budget: Musee de l’Orangerie and the Eiffel Tower!

Hey guys! How’s everything going?

I’m back again today talking about the rest of my trip earlier this year to Paris. I’ve already mentioned Moulin Rouge and MontmartreArc de Triomphe and Musee d’Orsay and Notre Dame and The Louvre, so feel free to have a look at those blog posts and let me know what your favourite places are to visit in Paris!

These are some of my remaining tips and trips when roaming about the city if you’re looking to save a few pennies:

DO: Take the subway

DON’T: Buy single trips

For the fourth day, we decided to head out to the Musee de l’Orangerie as it is one of the many places on Trip Advisor to visit. Blanche the subway stop was luckily only a few streets away from us so we hopped straight on. For anyone wanting to save a few pounds this is a really easy way (and quite frankly the only way) to travel about Paris. It’s surprisingly quite cheap if you buy a 5 day or week ticket and the trains are incredibly frequent too – you’re never waiting more than a couple of minutes for a ride!

After arriving at the museum I was happy to find that I once again had free entry as I was a 16-25 citizen of an EU country (one of the many perks you can benefit from if you are of this age). There is also the opportunity for any member of the public to gain free entry on the first Sunday of each month if you plan on travelling around this time.

The l’Orangerie gallery itself is much smaller than the others and is arranged into two main levels separated by a cafe and gift shop. On the top floor you can find Claude Monet’s water lillies completely covering all four sides of the room, so much so that you feel as if you are living in the paintings. However, the gallery’s beauty does not end here: downstairs you are greeted by tonnes of different works by Picasso, Cezanne, Renoir, Matisse etc. The collections themselves are honestly stunning so it’s definitely worth a trip when visiting Paris 🙂

DO: Take the steps up the Eiffel Tower

DON’T: Forget to attach a strap to your camera

We spent the rest of the afternoon walking to and going up the Eiffel Tower, which involved a lengthy queue through the security gates. Once into the centre however, you are free to choose how you wish to ascend the tower and after waiting ten minutes in the lift queue we opted for the stairs. I’m so happy we did! The queue for the lift was a mile long and the stairs provided a much better view of the surroundings and architecture. There were even lots of boards on the way up explaining the towers’ construction.

At the half way mark there are plenty of photo spots where people queue up to get their favourite Instagram photo and even a restaurant, cafe and ice rink too! I couldn’t believe that so much could fit into the inside of the tower. It was just a huge disappointment to find that the top of the Eiffel was closed due to the bad weather after we had come so far, but it was still absolutely amazing to be there.

To any newbie travellers I would definitely suggest bringing a strap for your camera or phone. The structure itself is similar to a metal cage, so any phones/cameras will be lost forever if you drop them. We all know that’s one of the worst things that could happen on holiday so I would more than recommend this to stop your holiday being remembered for the wrong reasons. Although, make sure you also don’t play into the hands of fraudsters around the edge and on the walk to the tower. Many artists line the streets hoping to distract you with magic or selfie sticks whilst an associate discretely mugs you. Keep a look out at all times and I’m sure you’ll enjoy your visit.

That’s everything for tonight! Where are your favourite places to visit when in Paris? How do you try to budget when abroad?

~Rose~

 P.s. The Eiffel also lights up beautifully at night too, so make sure you fit that in if you have the time whilst over there – it’s definitely worth it 😊

 

 

 

 

 

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travel

How to visit Paris on a budget: Notre Dame and The Louvre

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Hey everyone! How are you all doing today?

Tonight I started to write this post about my adventures in Paris again, only to realise that it’s been 3 WEEKS?! since I last spoke about my time there (yikes!). Sorry everyone! I had no idea it had been that long. After reaching fifty followers, celebrating the making of harry potter and then posting sunshine blogger award number 1 and 2, I guess all I can say is I was incredibly distracted! But I’m back today to bring you Notre Dame and The Louvre! I only have one more award on the horizon and then after that it’ll be the rest of this Paris venture I’m sharing with you 🙂

So here are some more of my tips and stories for you lovely travellers! …

DO: Dress in clothing appropriate for the weather 

DON’T: Forget to take any water/snacks with you you might want

Waking up on day three of our trip, mum and I decided to go and visit the Notre Dame. I honestly couldn’t believe that the queues were so long again – we were waiting around 20-30 minutes just to  get to the entrance – but it was worth it. The detail of the architecture on both the inside and outside was absolutely stunning and not only that, there were several boards explaining the history behind the construction of the cathedral. There was also the option of entering the treasury for additional 5 euros (only free to french/ student citizens), however this was definitely not worth the money. The room is filled with trophies, and in my eyes the true beauty laid with the main cathedral room itself.

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Anyway, the point I am getting to was that I did not have the best clothing on that day. After all of this, there was the option to go around the side of the building and scale the 387 steps to the top for the beautiful views of Paris. Unfortunately due to the nature of the building only having one set of steps on the side, the tour had to be done in stages, with a set of people waiting  in the gift shop half way up and a set at the top looking around. This may not seem like an issue to anyone reading, but when you take into consideration that it’s the middle of winter with freezing temperatures and you’re stood on top of a windy building, it’s really not that great. There were similarly no warnings whatsoever about being held at the top of the building before being able to come down, so make sure you wrap up really warm if you go on a cold day! A few chocolate bars I carried around were my saviours when we got back down to the bottom too – make sure you pack a buy a few snacks before setting off for the day!

DO: Check to see if there are any group ticket offers

DON’T: Unecessarily spend money on tickets

The rest of the day was spent at The Louvre, another absolutely stunning set of galleries with the famous glass prism. Three hours was nowhere near long enough to look around here, it would have taken closer to 2-3 days to see the entire thing. A member of staff even told me that to see each individual piece would be like walking a marathon! Wow! I of course also made sure to see the real Mona Lisa, and spotted her instantly from the crowds of people filling the room. I couldn’t even get close to look at her for everyone trying to take selfies nearby! Overall however, the experience was spectacular and without a doubt worth visiting.

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Here is the discount part:

As I mentioned in my last Arc de Triomphe and Musee d’Orsay post, there are many ways in which you can get discount. One of which allows you to get discount provided you are younger than 25 and a citizen from a country within the EU, which of course meant I entered freely into most places. Another way of getting discount is through buying tickets for several art galleries at once, or buying in advance online. As far as I am aware, The Louvre stands alone and so you can only buy a single ticket. However, other art galleries such as the Musee d’Orsay and Musee de l’Orangerie do offer a joint ticket, whereby you can receive a discount by purchasing the tickets together. On a side note, I should also mention that you can save by buying family tickets too!

Despite this, I would still make sure that you carefully plan out the amount of time needed to get around each attraction so as to not overspend. As a rule of thumb, it generally took a day for me to see two attractions considering queues/travel time/eating, so don’t just buy the ticket for the sake of it. You could even make a list of the places you want to visit each day to help you stay on track 🙂

Hope you enjoyed reading! What are your favourite ways to save money whilst on holiday?

~Rose~

 

 

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How to visit Paris on a budget: Arc de Triomphe and Musee d’Orsay

Hello! How are you doing today?

I’m pretty sure there must be some sort of apocalypse happening in England, because the temperatures rose to around 29 degrees today! It was so strange, but I’m not complaining about it at all! 🙂 How is the weather where you are?

Right, I left off yesterday with How to visit Paris on a budget: Moulin Rouge and Montmartre!, so I thought I’d continue with some more money saving tips on day 2.

  • Day 2 tips

DO: Carry some I.D or official documents with you

DON’T: Carry excessive amounts of money around

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On the second day of travelling, we decided to visit the famous Arc de Triomphe. After shortly arriving at the correct tube station, we were baffled as to how people managed to reach the Arc. In case you aren’t already aware, the entire thing is surrounded by an incredibly chaotic roundabout where everybody has the same right of way. There are at least 5 lanes of traffic around the attraction and therefore seemed impossible to reach without getting yourself killed first. At last, we walked around further and finally found a set of underground steps leading to the monument.

It was then that I found out that people under 18, or 18-25 and a citizen of and EU country and job seekers etc. could enter for free. I hadn’t considered this when leaving the hotel, but thankfully remembered I had taken a picture of my passport before leaving and showed them this. I would therefore recommend carrying some I.D. or official documents around with you. It is also incredibly useful to look online at free entry into places, as the majority of attractions have this offer.

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On the other hand, make sure you don’t carry excessive amounts of money with you. Paris is well-known for hundreds of pick-pocketers lining the streets. Many of them will even try to distract you by asking for directions, or by placing a bracelet on your wrist and then forcing you to buy it from them. Please don’t fall for any of these tricks and make sure to watch your bag at all times!

DO: Allow plenty of time for queues and viewing of attractions

DON’T: Arrive an hour before closing

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The next place on our list was Musee d’Orsay. For me, it was definitely up there as one of my favourite attractions in Paris and a must-see for anyone wanting to visit. However, if you are planning to go, make sure you arrive a few hours before the closing time. The queues at rush hour can take up to an hour and the galleries themselves up to 2 days inside! We only had approximately 3 hours here and ending up running around trying to see everything. There absolutely thousands of works of art, so ensure you take breaks along the way and carry some water with you!

In my opinion, there are so many beautiful pieces of art, from Monet to Whistler’s mother, even to the huge clock which fills the main room.

Hope you enjoyed reading. Who are your favourite artists?

~Rose~